Posts Tagged ‘iPad’

Er … oops. “Shome mishtake, shurely?” as Private Eye would have had it.

Yahoo and others

Regular readers of the blog will know that I am a big fan of my iPhone. Frankly, I love it to bits. I have a relationship with my iPhone. It is the single most brilliant and useful piece of equipment I have ever owned.

So I was interested to read and pass along that Apple have won more than $1 billion in a massive victory Friday over South Korean giant Samsung, in one of the biggest patent cases in decades – a verdict that could have huge market repercussions.

A BILLION dollars. That’s serious money, even by global finance standards.

Unsurprisingly, Samsung Electronics said it would contest the verdict.

“We will move immediately to file post-verdict motions to overturn this decision in this court and if we are not successful, we will appeal this decision to the Court of Appeals,” it said in a statement.

A jury in San Jose, California rejected Samsung’s counterclaims against Apple, according to media reports – a big win for the Silicon Valley giant, which had claimed its iconic iPhone and iPad had been illegally copied.

The jury, which had examined infringement claims and counter-claims by Apple and Samsung, ruled the South Korean electronics giant had infringed on a number of patents, the tech websites Cnet and The Verge said in live courtroom blogs.

The verdict affects patents on a range of Samsung products including some of its popular Galaxy smartphones and its Galaxy 10 tablet — devices alleged to have been copied from the iPhone and iPad.

“This is a huge, crushing win for Apple,” said Brian Love, a professor of patent law at Santa Clara University.

“All of its patents were held valid, and all but one were held to be infringed by most or all accused Samsung products. Even better for the company, five of the seven patents were held to be willfully infringed by Samsung.”

Love said this means that Judge Lucy Koh “now has the discretion to triple Apple’s damages award, which is already a monstrous and unprecedented $1.051 billion.”

Technology analyst Jeff Kagan said of the verdict: “This is a great day for Apple. And it will turn into a very expensive day for Samsung.”

Kagan said it was not immediately clear if Samsung would be able to continue to use the technology and pay Apple for the right to do so, or if they must pull their devices and re-design them.

In any case, the verdict in the case – one of several pending in global courts – is likely to have massive repercussions in the hottest part of the technology sector, smartphones and tablets.

Even a delay in sales could endanger Samsung’s position in the US market, where it is currently the top seller of smartphones.

A survey by research firm IDC showed Samsung shipped 50.2 million smartphones globally in the April-June period, while Apple sold 26 million iPhones. IDC said Samsung held 32.6 percent of the market to 16.9 percent for Apple.

The jury reached its verdict after deliberating for less than three days, examining claims of infringement by both sides. The trial heard evidence during 10 days over a three-week period.

Samsung had steadfastly denied the charges by Apple, claiming it developed its devices independently, and countersued in the case, seeking more than $400 million for infringement on its wireless patents.

The verdict came the same day a South Korean court ruled Apple and Samsung infringed on each other’s patents on mobile devices, awarding damages to both technology giants and imposing a partial ban on product sales in South Korea.

The court banned sales in South Korea of Apple’s iPhone 4 and iPad 2, as well as Samsung’s Galaxy S and Galaxy SII among other products.

We have been following this story on Wellthisiswhatithink. As it is still in front of the courts, we make no further comment, but simply reproduce the wider news coverage today of this fascinating case below …

Oooooops.

The Australian competition watchdog is seeking a $2.25 million fine against Apple for selling its new iPad as “wifi + 4G” when the device did not work on any existing Australian 4G networks.

The case was adjourned until next Wednesday to allow Justice Mordecai Bromberg of the Federal Court in Victoria to receive some confidential information about Apple’s operations in Australia.

Apple and the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission have asked Justice Bromberg to approve the proposed fine for misleading and deceptive conduct.

However, Justice Bromberg told the parties he was unhappy with the lack of information provided to the court about Apple’s financial position, the number of iPads that had been sold using the “Wifi + 4G” name and how many had been returned, and the difference between how the iPads would work on a 3G or 4G network.

“Surely the parties can at least put before the court some meaningful facts that identify a disparity between the products,” he said.

Alan Archibald, QC, acting for Apple, told the court it was irrelevant how many iPads had been sold or returned because Apple had offered to provide full refunds, so there was no loss to customers.

“What conceiveable damage might there be?” he said.

“This is a case of absence of loss – whatever the level of sales, there cannot be loss because anybody concerned about it could reverse the acquisition.”

Smaller bite

Mr Archibald argued that the $2.25 million fine should be reduced because of the absence of any loss to consumers. However, he did assure the Judge that there was “no question at all about [Apple’s] financial capacity to meet the penalty”.

Apple agreed to provide Justice Bromberg with confidential information about its financial position and the number of devices sold to allow him to judge whether the proposed penalty was appropriate.

“The parties face the risk that I might come to a view that I do not have sufficient agreed facts before me to be able to properly assess,” Justice Bromberg warned. He said he would reach a conclusion soon after receiving the new information.

Apple advertised its new iPad as “Wifi + 4G” from 8 March until the ACCC took it to court on March 28. Apple agreed to place notices at the point of sale explaining the devices did not work on any 4G or Wimax networks in Australia. On May 12 it changed the name to “Wifi + Cellular”.

This proposed fine is half of a potential $4.4 million fine which could be imposed on Apple for four contraventions of Australian Consumer Law.

The ACCC and Apple have agreed there were four contraventions when it advertised the product online, in signage, in the promotional material provided to resellers, and in the promotional material provided on Apple’s website.

(With thanks to The Age, and BusinessDay, and others)

As previously flagged in this blog, the new Apple iPad does NOT – currently – hook up with Telstra’s 4G in Australia (or Europe, or Asia) – although it hooks up to 4G standards in the USA and Canada. This Age article and video interview does an excellent job of explaining the issue and why the ACCC have now got very upset with Apple.

http://www.theage.com.au/business/apple-offers-refund-rejects-corrective-stickers-over-new-ipad-20120328-1vxlm.html

Apple’s defence, as I understand it, is that Australia simply doesn’t have what it considers a 4G network – which is an interesting charge for Telstra to rebut –  but it also hard not to think that Apple’s behaviour in promoting the product in the first place as 4G compatible in Australia was disingenuous at best, especially as the problem of hooking into Telstra was known about in advance.

Anyway, now Apple and the ACCC will both have to deal with the fallout. And costs, as they ended up in court. Silly billies.

New Apple iPad

The much-awaited new iPad is here. Apple CEO Tim Cook launching the latest killer product from surging Apple this morning.

Apple gave the new iPad a bunch of new features but no new name.

When it goes on sale next week in the U.S. and several other countries, it will be “the iPad” or perhaps “the new iPad” but not “iPad 3” or “iPad HD,” as some had speculated.

The lack of a new name could cause confusion for buyers, particularly since the older model, the “iPad 2,” will still be sold. But the naming practice is consistent with Apple’s practices for the iPod. New models were simply called “iPod,” and consumers were left to figure out which generation of the product they were looking for.

The new iPad revealed Wednesday has, as expected, a sharper screen, driven by a faster processing chip that acts as the brains of the device.

What was more surprising was that the new features mean the tablet computer will be slightly thicker and heavier than the iPad 2, because it needs a larger battery to power the high-resolution screen, although the difference is minimal. Text is reported as being “crystal clear”.

The battery life remains the same: about 10 hours of use.

In Australia prices are tipped to start at about $6-700, which will be about 50% more expensive than in the States. Given the strength of the Australian dollar, consumers could reasonably ask “Why”?

Top of the range models will reportedly be just over the thousand dollar mark.

Apple said the new display will be sharper than the average living room’s high-definition television set and show more vibrant colors than previous models.

“We are taking it to a whole new level and are redefining the category that Apple created with the original iPad,” Apple CEO Tim Cook said at the launch event in San Francisco.

Earlier, Cook spoke of a “post-PC” era dominated by the iPad and other Apple products.

The new iPad will go on sale March 16 in the U.S., Canada and 10 other countries. A week later, it will go on sale in 25 more countries.

Compared with the iPad 2, the new model features a higher-resolution camera on the back, similar to the one in the iPhone 4S but only offering some 5 megapixels, making it, by phone standards, a moderately low end camera.

The new iPad will be 9.4 millimeters thick, or 0.37 inches. That compares with 8.8 millimeters, or 0.34 inches, for the iPad 2. The weight is going up from 1.33 pounds to 1.44 pounds for the Wi-Fi-only model. The original iPad weighed 1.5 pounds.

It is expected that the new model will come in a version that can access Telstra’s faster 4G network, but exactly how successfully is yet to be revealed.

Apple is updating some of the software on the tablet to take advantage of the new features. For example, it’s introducing a version of the Mac’s iPhoto photo organization program for the iPad. The manufacturer also said it would start letting users store movies in its iCloud remote storage service, so they can be accessed through the Internet by PCs and Apple devices. It already lets users store photos, music and documents in the service.

Apple is also upgrading its Apple TV set-top box so it can play movies in 1080p, the highest-resolution commonly used video standard.

More Details: New iPad’s storage and Wi-Fi access vary

There are many flavors of the new iPad, with different access capabilities and storage amounts: which models will be available in Australia is yet to be confirmed.

• Wi-Fi only, 16 gigabytes of storage

• Wi-Fi only, 32GB

• Wi-Fi only, 64GB

• Wi-Fi and 4G cellular connection, 16GB

• Wi-Fi and 4G cellular connection, 32GB

• Wi-Fi and 4G cellular connection, 64GB

iPad2 prices are expected to fall to accommodate the new machine. The new iPad will go on sale on March 16 in the U.S., Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Japan, Puerto Rico, Singapore, Switzerland, United Kingdom and the U.S. Virgin Islands.