Posts Tagged ‘human rights’

It is a nightmare of Kafkaesque proportions.

Raif Badawi received the first 50 of his lashes in January

His family now say that Raif Badawi, already sentenced to a vicious public flogging and appalling ten years in prison, could also be tried for apostasy, which carries the death penalty.

The case attracted worldwide condemnation when he was publicly flogged in January.

Now his family say they have been told he is to be tried for apostasy.

“Apostasy charge is punishable under Saudi law with the death penalty by beheading,” they said in a message posted on Facebook.

“We also received confirmed information that the Supreme Court has referred Raif case to the same judge, who sentenced Raif with flogging and 10 years imprisonment.This judge is biased against Raif.”

Background to the case:

In July 2013 human rights activist Raif Badawi was sentenced in Saudi Arabia to seven years in jail, and 600 lashes, for insulting Islam. His sentence has now been increased to ten years and 1,000 lashes.

Raif and his children in happier times: one can hardly imagine how his family are suffering.

Raif and his children in happier times: one can hardly imagine how his family are suffering.

Badawi, founder of the Saudi Liberal Network, was convicted of “creating a website insulting Islam” and criticising the role of the notorious religious police. Before his arrest, Badawi’s network announced a “Day of Liberalism” and called for an end to the influence of religion on public life in Saudi Arabia. He has been languishing in jail since June 2012.

According to this report, the lawsuit against him was instigated by Saudi  by clerics. An appeals court overturned the original sentence and sent the case back for the case back for retrial, which culminated in the even harsher sentence.

A further court upheld the 10-year jail sentence and 1,000 lashes – also ordered him to pay a fine of one million riyals ($266,666).

The rights group’s co-founder, Souad Al Shamari said:

The only hope now is an amnesty from the king or a swift move by the justice minister to form a fair judicial committee. Even the worst terrorists have not received such a harsh sentence.

Mr Badawi, 31, received the first 50 of his 1,000 lashes in January. The rest of his punishment has been postponed because of injuries he sustained.

The flogging was surreptitiously filmed on a mobile phone, with footage uploaded to the internet.

It was conducted with a flexible stick, in front of a large crowd in the public square by the al-Jafali mosque in the Red Sea city of Jeddah. Mr Badawi was allowed to keep his shirt on, as is normal in Saudi Arabia, lessening the effects somewhat, but he can still be seen to flinch.

“Raif told me he is in a lot of pain,” Mrs Haidar said in an earlier statement released by Amnesty International, which has campaigned on his behalf. “He said that when he was being flogged he took the pain silently and rose above it, so that history will know that he did not react to their punishment.

Badawi was also given a jail sentence and a fine of £175,000 after being convicted of insulting Islam on a liberal online forum he created.

His family said he could not originally be charged with apostasy – abandoning his faith – because the criminal court could not deal with crimes that carry the death penalty. That changed with a new regulation passed last year.

Ensaf Haidar, wife of Raif Badawi, takes part in a news conference calling for the release of her husband in January (Reuters)

Ensaf Haidar, wife of Raif Badawi, takes part in a news conference calling for the release of her husband in January (Reuters)

They asked that Mr Badawi be pardoned and allowed to travel to Canada, where his wife and three children are now living.

“We call on the world citizens and governments not to leave Raif dragged by such bigots to death,” they added.

The death penalty is the standard penalty for apostasy in the Muslim world, though it is rarely carried out, even in Saudi Arabia which still carries out regular executions.

The Prince of Wales is believed to have raised the case during meetings with King Salman during a visit to Saudi Arabia in February.

How long will this courageous man be permitted to suffer?

How long will this courageous man be permitted to suffer?

We can only hope that the gale of protest around the world at the treatment of this entirely innocent man can cause the new Saudi regime to release him. These are our ALLIES, after all, with whom we have a huge trade relationship. That should count for something in asking them to listen to our concerns.

If you wish to do something, why not tweet your call for Badawi to be immediately released, using the hashtag ‪#‎Raifbadawi‬ ?

Alternatively, or as well, sign the change.org petition? Click below, and thank you:

https://www.change.org/p/free-and-safeguard-the-liberal-saudi-raif-badawy-no-600-lashes

Or perhaps you could simple share this blog on your blog, or on your Facebook page?

Whatever you can do to help, thank you.

Moscow (AFP) – Russian authorities confirmed Thursday that jailed Pussy Riot punk band member Nadezhda Tolokonnikova had been moved to a new prison in Siberia, after three weeks of worrying uncertainty about her whereabouts.

Nadezhda Tolokonnikova's incredibly courageous fight continues, from hospital.

Nadezhda Tolokonnikova’s incredibly courageous fight continues, now from hospital.

Her husband Pyotr Verzilov, who spoke to his wife by phone, said she has been weakened by a recent hunger strike and is currently at a hospital for convicts rather than the prison itself, which is in the Siberian Krasnoyarsk region.

Friends and activists have been concerned about Tolokonnikova’s situation as the Russian authorities moved her thousands of kilometres (miles) by train across Russia without saying where she was.

“Convict Tolokonnikova has arrived to an institution of the Russian prison service in the Krasnoyarsk region,” the region’s prison service said in a statement.

A spokesman for the service said he was not authorised to give detailed information out, but told AFP that Tolokonnikova was feeling “normal”.

Tolokonnikova, 24, had been missing for 24 days after being moved out of her original prison colony in central Russia’s Mordovia region. She had earlier published a letter in Russian media alleging prison abuse and held a hunger strike in protest.

Her letter said the colony has round-the-clock “slave labour”, with 17-hour days in a sewing workshop, beatings, and lack of sanitary facilities.

Verzilov said Tolokonnikova has in fact been for the past two days in a regional tuberculosis hospital in the city of Krasnoyarsk, a medical ward for convicts in the region.

She does not have tuberculosis but is being treated and examined after health complications that followed her hunger strike, Verzilov said, adding he hoped to see his wife on Friday.

“She is not happy with the isolation of her transfer, but she is content that her conditions have been met,” he told AFP.

Tolokonnikova had demanded to be moved out of her Mordovia colony and started eating when this was done, he said.

Prison authorities are not required to tell relatives of the convicts’ whereabouts until 10 days after transferring them to a new place.

Transfers often take weeks as convicts are slowly moved on trains with stopovers in various prisons in the vast country.

There are no legal limitations as to how long these transfers may take, however they are rarely done in strict isolation and information about prisoners’ whereabouts leaks out via other prisoners.

Tolokonnikova’s long transfer and information vacuum had led rights groups to demand information, with Amnesty International citing “serious concerns regarding her safety and wellbeing.”

Verzilov had earlier said he believed his wife was bound for Nizhny Ingash, a town in the taiga that lies on the Trans-Siberian railway about 300 kilometres (185 miles) from the regional centre Krasnoyarsk and four time zones away from Moscow.

Tolokonnikova and fellow band member Maria Alyokhina, who is being kept in the Ural region of Perm, will in March have served out their jail sentence for performing a “punk prayer” in Moscow’s main Orthodox cathedral protesting ties between the Russian Orthodox Church and the Kremlin.

The conviction and sentencing of Tolokonnikova and Alyokhina on charges of hooliganism sparked an international outcry.