Posts Tagged ‘Daily Mirror’

_76955875_downton

 

We wish we could claim that headline as our own, but we must credit the Daily Mirror, who amongst people – well, pretty much the whole world, actually – spotted a plastic water bottle nestling incongruously in the latest set of publicity shots for the iconic British soap-opera-cum-drama.

As plastic water bottles don’t come along for another 60 years or so after the supposed era of the show, the mistake has been gleefully picked up on by the worldwide media. Well, it’s either a silly mistake, or it’s the best possible little publicity ploy they ever dreamed up.

Anyway. “Oh joy of snobbish, asparagus-fork-waving joys. Downton Abbey is back,” said the Daily Mail’s Jan Moir. “At first look, the fifth series appears to be just as glorious and gloriously silly as ever.”

The Times’s Alex Spence says viewers can expect the latest series to be “less gloomy” than the last, which featured a death, rape and the aftermath of World War One, adding: “The series premiere, screened for journalists in London yesterday, depicted a lighter, happier mood around the estate than during the last series.” That’s good news for the Wellthisiswhatithink household who were threatening rebellion the show had become so relentlessly gloomy. And let’s not forget there was a probable murder hinted at in the final episode, too.

“There are enough parties and drama to do the Roaring Twenties justice,” reckoned Express reviewer Elisa Roche. “The brilliant series opener will leave viewers dreaming of owning a luxurious wardrobe and a well-stocked pantry.”

Meanwhile, the Telegraph remembers Labour leader Ed Miliband’s quip that the Tory party reminded him of Downton Abbey’s “out-of-touch” aristocrats and says “It would appear the dislike is mutual.” Anita Singh wrote: “It opens in 1924, the year Ramsay MacDonald became prime minister [in Labour’s first government], and the Earl of Grantham makes plain his feelings on the matter: ‘This government,’ he warns, ‘is committed to the destruction of people like us and everything we stand for.'” Well, goodness. It was bad enough when he was pissed off at Lloyd George.

michelle

“It is the rise of socialism that threatens to destroy the world’s favourite English country house for good,” agrees the Independent’s Adam Sherwin. But he adds that despite the foray into politics, life goes on as normal: “No opportunity for plot signalling is avoided – an early-hours house fire is inevitably used to expose who has tip-toed into the wrong bedroom.”

However, nearly all papers were most fascinated by the publicity shot of the Earl and his daughter, Lady Edith – played by Hugh Bonneville and Laura Carmichael. The Mirror takes the pun prize all round, describing it as a “real dampener”.

Anyway, be that as it may, we think the big news is that by the time Series 5 rolls onto our screens in January, Lady Mary is no longer mournfully turning down every suitor and is right back in the dating game. Good news. The ineffably beautiful Michelle Dockery would be worth watching reading the phone book in our quietly besotted view. Seeing her trip the light fantastic with a string of handsome beaus will be quite charming.

Apparently Ms Dockery is not at all posh in real life, indeed she’s an Essex girl originally and currently lives in the East End of London, and likes nothing better than a quick pint in her local pub to relax. Really, who knew? Our type of gal, dammit.

As always, to enjoy our huge list of bloopers, cock ups and downright F*** Ups from the world of media and advertising (amongst other things) just pop “F*** Up” in the Search box top left on this page, and press Enter.

Looking forward to a little "Me" time, no doubt. Queen Beatrix steps down.

Looking forward to a little “Me” time, no doubt. Queen Beatrix steps down.

Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands stepping down in April at age 75 so her 45-year-old son can become king is sparking some speculation in Britain about whether Elizabeth might follow suit so her eldest son, Prince Charles, can start his reign.

One European queen has announced her retirement. So any chance Europe’s most famous queen – Elizabeth II of Britain – might join her?

No, it’s not likely, experts say.

Elizabeth is 86. Charles, 64, has been heir to the throne since he was three.

The British press tweaked these concerns Tuesday, with the Daily Mirror featuring a photo of Beatrix with the headline: “Queen Gives Up Her Throne to Son.” Then, in smaller type, “Easy, Charles…It’s Queen Beatrix of Netherlands.”

Others said, “Sorry Charles…it’s in Holland, not here!”

But commentators quickly noted that Elizabeth – who seems to be in excellent health – has said in the past that she regards being queen as a “job for life.”

At her Diamond Jubilee last summer marking 60 years on the throne, former Prime Minister John Major said the idea that the queen would abdicate was “absolutely absurd.” He said she would serve her entire life unless a health crisis made it impossible.

And watching the Diamond Jubilee celebrations from over here in Australia, she certainly looked hale and hearty, not to say fearsomely determined.

Author Robert Lacey, who has written several books about the British monarchy, said Beatrix’s decision would likely firm up Elizabeth’s resolve not to abdicate.

“It would reinforce her feeling that the Dutch don’t know what monarchy is about, and that she should go on forever,” he said. “The crown is a job for life in the British system.”

He said the present queen’s mother, who of course lived to be 101, had made a “snarky” comment when Beatrix’s own mother stepped down as monarch decades ago.

Lacey said the idea of abdicating is particularly unpleasant for Elizabeth because her uncle, King Edward VIII, abdicated in 1936 so he could marry Wallis Simpson, a divorced American woman.

The resulting scandal, remembered as a low point for the monarchy, brought her father, King George VI, to the throne, and it is widely believed that the strain of his holding that position – having to conquer a dreadful stammer, and lead his country through World War II – led to his early demise.

No one in British history has been heir apparent as long as the now greying Charles, who is set to become a grandfather when his daughter-in-law, the former Kate Middleton, gives birth this (northern) summer.

Wellthisiswhatithink considers that there is one factor in the coverage of this oft-ventilated matter that may have been ignored.

Prince Philip: could his health hold the key to the Queen's ultimate decision?

Prince Philip: could his health hold the key to the Queen’s ultimate decision?

The Queen’s husband, Prince Philip, is clearly suffering from the natural ailments of being in his 90s, including being hospitalised twice in the last year. Whether the Queen would wish to continue on the throne if he died is problematical.

The relationship between the two is shrouded in royal mystery, but those who know say that she relies very much on his unstinting support for her, and his instinctive defensiveness of her position and rank.

Queen Victoria, of course, whose record on the throne the Queen is well aware of as she closes in on it, famously went on after the death of her beloved Albert.

But that was when she was still a relatively young woman.

Whether or not Elizabeth would want to continue on the throne if something happened to Philip is another matter.

Still, she is steely and has a strong sense of duty, bequeathed from her parents. Anything is possible.

At least, in the meantime, Charles appears to be shedding some of the stigma of the Diana years, and recovering some measure of the popularity of his youth.

Even Camilla seems to have become grudgingly popular. And by the way, how similar she looks to Princess Beatrix? Curious, huh?

(Yahoo, Daily Mail and others)