As I write this …

Posted: December 29, 2011 in Humour, Popular Culture et al
Tags: , , , , , ,

… “Well This Is What I Think” just whizzed past 10,000 hits. As I write it sits on 10,002, to be precise. This is a Very Good Thing.

10,000 hits - whoot!

10,000 hits? World domination can be but a throw of the dice away.

Heartfelt thanks to everyone who has read, commented, re-posted, promoted and otherwise supported the blog.

Of course, there is really nothing more significant about 10,000 than 9,900 or 10,172, or any other figure, actually, but human beings have long enjoyed ascribing mystical meanings to particular “special” numbers.

There is even an obscure word for this strange human predilection for ascribing significance to otherwise insignificant numbers, which is “Apophenia”. There you are, you see: the whole article wasn’t a complete waste of time, now was it? What a useful word to know. I first mentioned it when I rambled about the complete irrelevance of the date being 11.11.11. If you missed the article, enjoy it here: https://wellthisiswhatithink.wordpress.com/2011/11/11/today-really-is-very-eleventy-how-bout-that/

Interestingly, and un-plannedly, this was my 111th post. Spooky, huh? My next “stop the world I want to make a note of this number” will be 15,000, I think. All help getting there gratefully received. I will endeavour to make the process of achieving that goal both fun and informative.

And you can thank Wikipedia for this little digest – a myriad, one could say – of bits and pieces about the number 10,000. In deference to the wonder of this entirely free information source, I have left all their links in. So, Happy Wiki-ing, folks. And if anyone knows any other significant 10,000-ers, just leave a comment. And thank you – everyone – again.

10,000

Many languages have a specific word for this number: In English it is myriad, in Ancient Greek μύριοι, in Aramaic ܪܒܘܬܐ, in Hebrew רבבה (revava), in Chinese 萬/万 (Mandarin wàn, Cantonese maan6), in Japanese 万/萬 [man], in Korean 万/만/萬 [man], and in Thai หมื่น [meun]. It is often used to mean an indefinite very large number.

The Greek root was used in the earlier versions of the metric system in the form myria-.

The number can be written 10,000 (UK and US), 10 000 (transition metric), or 10•000 (with the dot raised to the middle of the zeroes; metric).

In mathematics

In science

In time

10,000 days can be expressed in these alternative units:

  • 864,000,000 seconds
  • 14,400,000 minutes
  • 240,000 hours
  • 1428 weeks (rounded down)

In other fields

Comments
  1. URL says:

    … [Trackback]…

    […] There you will find 92063 more Infos: wellthisiswhatithink.wordpress.com/2011/12/29/as-i-write-this/ […]…

    Like

  2. […] so – back at 10,000 hits (and again at 15,000 hits) we had a bit of a celebration because the blog had reached lots and lots […]

    Like

  3. Meidlinger78 says:

    Rattling excellent information!

    Like

What do YOU think? That's what matters. Please comment!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s