Posts Tagged ‘blogging success’

 

Seeing as how, like, we work in the good old ad industry thingy to earn a crust, we have remarked many times how in today’s wired-up world one unhappy incident can turn into a worldwide embarrassment.

Ryanair: today, it's all about the, er, cock up.

Hmmmm.

We can spend millions on advertising and marketing, but it takes just one dis-satified, disgruntled customer to start a hare running that can cause lost custom, a trashed brand, and a story that could run and run for weeks or months, running out of control into the darkest and unreachable corners of the world wide interweb.

One such story about a complaint letter sent to Ryanair was posted to Facebook on April 25th, by James Lockley, and is rapidly going viral, apparently. Indeed, people are re-posting it on their Facebook pages and Twitter accounts pleading with people to help the story go viral.

Without commenting on the veracity of the content, the letter is also very funny.

Let us make this clear: we weren’t at Stansted airport with James and his missus so we can’t judge the bona fides of the story one way or the other, and in our experience there are always two sides to every story. Our interest is therefore not in the incident itself, but in how social media makes companies’ reputations vulnerable to customers with a gripe, and how they need to be aware of the risk and have plans to mitigate it.

The airline is apparently in touch with the customer. We await further news with interest.

For other F*** Ups just put F*** Up in the search box top left of the page – there are lots to enjoy …

And by the way, we would just like to note that this is the 700th blog on Wellthisiswhatithink – over the last couple of years we have enjoyed many thousands of hits and comments, with a more than healthy number of “followers” and lots of great interaction with you, our much-valued readers. We’d just like to say thank you, and keep reading!

cead

Overnight, Wellthisiswhatithink smashed triumphantly through the “100,000 articles read barrier”. We can only say we are delighted, heart-warmed, humbled, and excited at this major milestone.

One hundred thousand readings of whatever it is we have been burbling about is an astonishing compliment, Dear Reader, and one that we can only respond to with an increased determination to deliver commentary, thoughts and stories that you will continue to find stimulating, thought-provoking and meaningful.

As is customary at such moments, and in the fading light of a blessedly cool and grey afternoon, we turn to Google to find anything else interesting to say about the figure 100,000.

First and foremost, one hundred thousand (100,000) is the natural number following 99999 and preceding 100001. In scientific notation, it is written as 105. So there.

In South Asia, one hundred thousand is called a lakh. The Thai, Lao, Khmer and Vietnamese languages also have separate words for this number: แสน, ແສນ, សែន [saen] and ức [uc] respectively.

In astronomy, 100,000 metres, (equivalent to 62 miles) is the altitude at which the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) defines spaceflight to begin.

In the Irish Language, Ceád Mile Fáilte (pronounced: KAY-ed MEE-luh FOIL-cha) is a popular greeting meaning “A Hundred Thousand Welcomes”. Which seems a neat way to sum up our gratitude to everyone who has visited the blog.

In piphilology, (wonderful word), one hundred thousand is the current world record for the number of digits of pi memorized by a human being.

Lucinda Drayton

Lucinda Drayton

But by far the most delightful surprise we found when scouring the worldwide resources of the interweb for references to 100,000 was this gorgeous song “100,000 Angels” which was originally by a band called Bliss and has been covered by a variety of singers such as here by Lucinda Drayton, (who toured with Bliss), and more recently by Sinead O’Connor.

The more world-weary amongst you may be surprised that I believe angels walk the earth with us, but if one has any religious belief they are mentioned repeatedly in religious documents of all major faiths, and I believe that if we listen, we can hear their guidance.

As someone said: Our “unseen friends” surround us with their love and light daily. You have to reach out beyond the dark periods in your life. Learn the lesson, act with pure intent and listen to your conscience.”

Reach beyond – yes, one must be active to hear the angels. Especially in times of challenge or grief. Whilst you must acknowledge it, you must reach past current difficulty. Look away from the problems, the sadnesses, and the fear. Look for goodness, search for meaning, and celebrate the possible.

Very often, the joy we seek is all around us, we just don’t notice it.

I also believe, profoundly, that the angels sent to us are often simply the people we meet, often entirely unaware that their steps or actions are being guided to help us, and completely un-knowing of the effect their strength, kindness or advice is having on us.

The music is soothing, and ethereally beautiful. The video is rather exquisite, too. Let it in.

Do you
Hear me calling you?
The voice of a mother, a father and a child
Would you recognize the truth?
Do you feel a love that’s falling from my eyes?

Take just a minute
Come and rest you by my side
Let me tell you your own story
Let me walk you through your lives
Only a second
That’s all it takes to realize
There’s a hundred thousand angels
By your side

Do you
Hear me talk to you?
I whisper through the doorways
And pathways of your mind
Clear like the morning dew
And fresh from my journey
Cross an ocean of blue

Take just a minute
Come and rest you by my side
Let me tell you your own story
Let me walk you through your lives
Only a second
That’s all it takes to realize

There’s a hundred thousand angels by your side
There’s a hundred thousand angels here, tonight

If you need an angel, I hope one is near you.

Here’s to the next 100,000 conversations. With love, Stephen.

Mary Gelpi and her dog Monty. And, er, red pants.

Mary Gelpi and her dog Monty. And, er, red pants.

I found this little poem on a blog called by Fibromy-Awesome, written by a charming and intelligent young lady called Mary Gelpi who is currently struck down by a bunch of crappy medical problems that she refuses to allow to defeat her.

I find reading her blog thoroughly uplifting, sometimes bringing me close to tears, occasionally very funny, and always well written. Many others agree, and I commend it to you.

Anyhow, while reading her stuff today I happened on some of her poetry, and as you will know, Dear Reader, I am something of a scribbler of rhyming couplets myself, and this one actually both moved me and made me guffaw simultaneously, which is a rare trick.

I don’t think I would have written it quite this way, but show me a poet who wouldn’t change something about what someone else has written and I will show you a poet bereft of passion and dying.

It’s sharp, and genuinely witty. Enjoy.

New People

There are two things people ask you
When they meet you for the first time.
What is your name?
What is it that you do?

I dislike these questions
They don’t actually reveal too much
of anything
about who we are.

Our name says something about our parents.
Our job says something about the world.

I have my grandmothers name
And now I’m unemployed.
Should we keep talking?

 

PS I am always glad to publish poems submitted to the blog provided they’re not, you know – how does one put this – utter crap*? Just email them to me at steveyolland@yahoo.com.

*Nota bene – utter crap of course means “I didn’t like it”. Everyone’s a critic, right?

I am always being asked – usually very grumpily – why I fulminate on matters outside the borders of Australia by people who obviously believe that none of us have the right to speak truth (OK, I will concede, “our version of the truth”) to citizens of other countries.

And my stock response is, “Because I believe countries are artificial constructions, and I don’t think national boundaries should prevent the free flow of opinion, as we are all, first Citizens of the Wor4ld, not citizens of wherever we happen to live …” which always produces howls of derision from those who originally asked why I dared to say what I think, and murmurs of approval from anyone else.

And one day, recently, a very nice person in another forum where I post links to the blog – Linked In – kindly remarked that she thought I “am the bravest person posting in Linked In – I know it’s scary, but you keep raising important issues.”

I should warn you, everyone, one comment like that can keep me spouting off for a year or more.

Anyhow, here’s your real answer, Dear Reader. You just seem to be an amazingly international person … so I try and include content (or opinion) from all over the world, providing I think the content is important, or I can think of anything relevant to add to it.

How funny that orange is my favourite colour …

As I have explained many times, by far the most regular readers of my blog are Americans, who read my blog more than three times as much as my fellow Aussies.

From a country as saturated as media as it is, I consider this a great compliment, as it implies they think someone this far away has something relevant to say to them.

Either that or they’re masochists and they just love to hate me.

Whatever their reasons, I am grateful for the continual support from the good ol’ US of A. And the next biggest bunch of readers are from my old homeland in the UK, who also out poll the Aussies. This is perhaps understandable as once, deep – deep – in the last Millenium, I had something of a public profile in the Old Dart, but it is humbling and heart-warming to know that after 25 years as an Aussie they are still remotely concerned about what I think.

Either that, or my articles on sausages strike a chord.

Looking at the map, the sheer reach of blogging in the Internet age becomes clear. My words – or yours, if I have been re-blogging something – reach into almost every corner of the planet, which is something I find really quite awe-inspiring. Places I shall presumably never visit nevertheless know a little of me, virtually, at least. And whilst I recognise that the Internet can be something of a curate’s egg as far as information gathering goes – after all, how do you judge whether what you read is valid, true, biased, or … what? – it is without any doubt a remarkable step forward for the free and unsupervised dissemination of information.

Or at least, the attempted dissemination.

The Great Firewall of China has me blocked, for example. Which is quite bizarre, as I have visited China a number of times, I like the country and its people, and I wish both well as they continue their great strides onto the world stage. Or maybe I am blocked because all of WordPress is, just in case. But I think it’s me, because before my friends over there started reporting that they couldn’t read my work, fully six of them had done so. Mine was a star that shone very momentarily over the Oldest of Old Kingdoms. Hong Kong, however, can read me, and does. How curious.

I think it’s totally brilliant – totes brill as Fruit of One’s Loins would have it -  that WordPress provide one with these stats, partly out of my sheer fascination in trawling them, but also because if one covers a topic concerning, say Sri Lanka, then one can track the sudden up-tick of interest from that country as the story crawls its way from computer to computer. They also tell you what search terms most often bring people to one’s pages, and yes, Dear Reader, the top one on mine is still “tits”, and long may it be so.

(Stick tits into the search box at the top left on this site and you’ll see why.)

Interesting anomalies occur all the time. Sweden delivers about double the hits that I get from their neighbours Norway and Finland. I really am curious as to why – presumably it is a matter of population, internet access, English language skills and stuff like that. But I also wonder if it is because I post semi-regularly on the cases of Bradley Manning, the provider and founder of Wikileaks, respectively, and Assange is assuredly of interest in Sweden for various reasons.

What is also interesting is the very few countries that are not represented on the map at all, as they indicate with clarity where some of the poorest nations of the world are. Sub-saharan and central Africa especially. Or where internet access is simply impossible.

I see you there, little singular net surfing person, I see you, shakin’ dat mouse.

A whole bunch of places, although the list is getting smaller the longer the blog stays up, have recorded just one hit on the blog in the last 11 months.

One little idle, solitary flick of a finger, one man or woman, who I see in my mind’s eye, hunched over their laptop or desktop in the dark, screen glowing, hungrily gobbling up my profound thoughts on Angela Merkel, President Obama, the food we will be eating in 40 years, vaginal surgery, the mauling of the English language, the weather in Australia (and climate change generally) or – whatever.

I do hope you will drop by again, my solitary visitor from Djibouti, Lesotho, the Islamic Republic of Iran, Samoa, Togo, Aruba, Dominica, Lichtenstein, the Federated States of Micronesia, Angola, Haiti, Guadeloupe, Kyrgyzstan, the Solomon Islands, and last but by no means least, Vatican City.

Your voices need to be heard, and very often, I suspect, they need to be heard much more than mine does.

Then again, you could just be searching for tits, in which case, welcome aboard.

Post scriptum: I nearly forgot to mention that this is also my four hundred and oneth blog in a little over a year, and I could not have done it without all the feedback, positive and negative, so thanks very much! WordPress has stopped sending me little “gee up”  messages as I pass each milestone, which is a bit sad, really. They’ve obviously decided I am hooked. All gee up messages, therefore, gratefully received.

Times a thousand. The first 48,000 are the hardest, they say.

How weird it is to idly click on one’s blog stats, and see that one has just clicked past a milestone.

Why is 48,000 hits a milestone? (And One. We are not forgetting you, dear One.)

Well, it’s an awful lot, innit? Well, I think it is. We last stopped to pause for thought at 25 thou. Crikey, doesn’t time fly when you’re having fun?

So why did we stop this time? Well, four and eight are also favourite numbers of mine. It is amazing to me how often good things have happened to me at either 4:08 or 8:04, am or pm, either one. Go figure, if you’ll pardon the pun.

I don’t believe in numerology. Or a whole heap of other such stuff. But dear old four and eight have never let me down. Which is generous of them, given that my lucky number is 29.

So as always when wepause to celebrate a milestone, I checked to see if 48,000 had any greater significance I had missed.

Apparently Australians spent around 48,000 years surfing the web in December. That’s 576,000 months. But there are only 15.6 million Australians with web access, so I make that 0.037 of a month, per person, or about 15 minutes per person.

Well, I can spend that long reading reviews of next week’s episode of Game of Thrones. And based on the numbers of searches for “tits” that end up on my blog, I call bullshit.

Meandering around, I also note that the Australian Greens have raised concerns over the 48,000 young people and their families who may miss out on important family payments as a result of cost cutting measures in the Federal budget.

The changes will save $360.9 million over four years by reducing the age of eligibility for FTB A, but will also leave around 48,000 young people in a position where they do not qualify for Youth Allowances and where their parents will not receive FTB A for them.

“Under the changes, parents of around 48,000 young people will lose eligibility under FTB A, but those young people will not have access to Youth Allowance or other forms of income support,” Greens spokesperson for families and community services, Senator Rachel Siewert said today.

So much for Labor worrying about “working families”. I call bullshit for the second time.

What isn’t bullshit, though, is that you, Dear Reader, have propelled us past the magic 4, 8, triple 0. And for that, we thank you. Thank you, everybody, for reading, thinking and commenting, and we will pause again for reflection at 84,000.

Keep clicking, for Gawd’s sake.

P.S  Forty eight thousand is deadly dull, but 48 is quite interesting.

Forty-eight is a double factorial of 6, a highly composite number. Like all other multiples of 6, it is a semiperfect number. 48 is the second 17-gonal number.

48 is in abundance having an aliquot sum of 76. It is the lowest composite number to fall into the 41-aliquot tree having the 7 aliquot number sequence,(48, 76, 64, 63, 41, 1, 0). 48 is highly abundant with an aliquot sum 158% higher than itself.

48 is the smallest number with exactly ten divisors.

There are 11 solutions to the equation φ(x) = 48, namely 65, 104, 105, 112, 130, 140, 144, 156, 168, 180 and 210. This is more than any integer below 48, making 48 a highly totient number.

Since the greatest prime factor of 482 + 1 = 2305 is 461, which is clearly more than 48 twice, 48 is a Størmer number.

48 is in base 10 a Harshad number. It has 24, 2, 12,and 4 as factors.

I am happy to confirm that I do not have a fucking clue what all that means. I gave up maths after fluking a pass at “O” Level which I could not convince my teacher was not the result of cheating. But I do know that 48 is also the atomic number of cadmium, and the number of Ptolemaic constellations.

So there.

OK, so – back at 10,000 hits (and again at 15,000 hits) we had a bit of a celebration because the blog had reached lots and lots of readers. Which is a Very Good Thing, capital V, capital G, capital T. And so as not to appear too self congratulatory, I said the next little milestone would be at 25,000, assuming it would be a fair way off.

Well, it wasn’t, because we have just belted through 25,000 hits and more when I wasn’t looking, helped by some wonderful advertising f*** ups, and some poetry, and not a little of being rude about the Republican Party.

Anyway, back at 10,000 it was really interesting, because Wikipedia had this really cool article about all things 10,000-ish which I shared with you.

Sadly, I have to tell you, dear Reader, that finding anything to go with a celebration of 25,000 is much harder. Much.

25,000 Dinar

25,000 Iraqi Dinars. Before you get too excited, that's about US$21.45 right now. Don't bother printing it off and trying to pass it.

The best Wikipedia could do was this rather attractive Iraqi money.

A number of websites offered to sell me cars all under 25,000 somethings, mainly Aussie dollars.

And Flat Finder told me they had over 25,000 apartments on offer in Australia.

There’s a battery charger called  CTek XS 25,000. There’s not many people know that.

And Kenya has just fired 25,000 striking health workers.

Oh, and an outbreak of Avian flu in rural Victoria resulted in 25,000 ducks getting the chop. Awww.

And a woman in Dublin received 25,000 Euros for a botched cosmetic surgery thing on her lips. The way the Euro’s going I hope she spends it soon.

But that’s about it for our massive, once in a lifetime celebration of all things 25,000-ish people.

Not terribly inspiring, I’m sorry. I will pick our next number to celebrate more carefully – and, as always, thanks so much to everyone who reads the blog, and comments, and passes it on. You’re why.

Meanwhile, un-noticed by all except close family, 21 years ago Monday just passed my darling daughter popped into this world, and after hanging around a bit, rather quickly in the end, actually.

At one point my wife asked the midwife “What’s happening?” The midwife calmly replied “You’re having a baby.” My wife somewhat tiredly asked “When?” The midwife drily replied, “Er, now.”

And out she came.

So on Monday we had a few drinks, and then a few more, and there’s going to be a big party soon, of course, and, you know, all the things people do when someone has a significant birthday.

Which is much more of a something to celebrate, really, than a battery charger or a strike in Kenya, or even a blog. So I thought I’d mention it.

I’ve been quieter than usual, this week, because I’ve been thinking about what it means to have a 21 year old daughter. Sadly, I keep running up against the most obvious conclusion “Sh*t, man, you got old.” It’s hard to ignore the fact that the body is beginning to creak alarmingly, and the brain doesn’t go quite as quick as it used to. But all in all, I am content with my lot.

Because, you know, kids don’t come with a manual, no matter how many people try to sell us one in the bookstores, and her mother and I just muddled along as best we could, making plenty of mistakes, clinging onto each other for dear life sometimes as the waves of life rocked our little boat backwards and forwards, but we made sure that what we did do for the kid was try to teach her right from wrong – and always to hang onto what’s right – to always believe in her dreams, to be able to talk to us about anything, and to love her to bits.

Good, bad, indifferent, grumpy, cheerful, frightened, brave, loud, quiet, hard-working, feckless, in love, out of love, in sickness and in health, we just loved her to bits. And always will.

In return, she grew, miraculously, before our very eyes, into this infinitely better and more golden and more caring and more insightful human than us.

Which is all, on reflection, that I think you can really hope for when you set out – that you leave behind you a child who is just the best that you can both be, and then some.

And she is. So “well done Caitlin”. You turned out real good. Thank you. And please remember I really want cable TV in the old folks’ home. I don’t care if the place smells of cabbage and wees, but it must have cable TV.

OK? Deal.

Exactly 19 years and three days ago. My God, I look young.

 

 

 

 

Great article about the never-ending pain that is blogging, or writing generally. Do yourself a favour and have a great laugh. Go here:

Did My Post Suck Today?

Well done, Sweet Mother.

Anyhow, it’s just the perfect post for one of these days … we all have them.

Well, it’s like this. We meant to have a big celebration when Wellthisiswhatithink passed 15,000 hits. Like we did when we passed 10,000.

17,000 hits

17,000 hits? Blimey!

Then a few of our blogs went batshit, and we have just belted past 17,000 before you could say “I’ve come over all viral, Vera, pass me pills.”

Sadly, despite assiduously trawling the interweb on your behalf, we can’t find anything interesting to say about the number 17,000 at all, except to say that, well, it’s an awful lot of readers, donating your valuable time to read what we think.

And, needless to say, we thank you all very much indeed, and ask you to please keep coming back.

So without further ado, onwards and upwards, and we will endeavour to keep posting stuff we find interesting, or important.

Please continue to comment, praise, lambast, and above all, spread the word about stuff that you think is important, too!

… “Well This Is What I Think” just whizzed past 10,000 hits. As I write it sits on 10,002, to be precise. This is a Very Good Thing.

10,000 hits - whoot!

10,000 hits? World domination can be but a throw of the dice away.

Heartfelt thanks to everyone who has read, commented, re-posted, promoted and otherwise supported the blog.

Of course, there is really nothing more significant about 10,000 than 9,900 or 10,172, or any other figure, actually, but human beings have long enjoyed ascribing mystical meanings to particular “special” numbers.

There is even an obscure word for this strange human predilection for ascribing significance to otherwise insignificant numbers, which is “Apophenia”. There you are, you see: the whole article wasn’t a complete waste of time, now was it? What a useful word to know. I first mentioned it when I rambled about the complete irrelevance of the date being 11.11.11. If you missed the article, enjoy it here: http://wellthisiswhatithink.wordpress.com/2011/11/11/today-really-is-very-eleventy-how-bout-that/

Interestingly, and un-plannedly, this was my 111th post. Spooky, huh? My next “stop the world I want to make a note of this number” will be 15,000, I think. All help getting there gratefully received. I will endeavour to make the process of achieving that goal both fun and informative.

And you can thank Wikipedia for this little digest – a myriad, one could say – of bits and pieces about the number 10,000. In deference to the wonder of this entirely free information source, I have left all their links in. So, Happy Wiki-ing, folks. And if anyone knows any other significant 10,000-ers, just leave a comment. And thank you – everyone – again.

10,000

Many languages have a specific word for this number: In English it is myriad, in Ancient Greek μύριοι, in Aramaic ܪܒܘܬܐ, in Hebrew רבבה (revava), in Chinese 萬/万 (Mandarin wàn, Cantonese maan6), in Japanese 万/萬 [man], in Korean 万/만/萬 [man], and in Thai หมื่น [meun]. It is often used to mean an indefinite very large number.

The Greek root was used in the earlier versions of the metric system in the form myria-.

The number can be written 10,000 (UK and US), 10 000 (transition metric), or 10•000 (with the dot raised to the middle of the zeroes; metric).

In mathematics

In science

In time

10,000 days can be expressed in these alternative units:

  • 864,000,000 seconds
  • 14,400,000 minutes
  • 240,000 hours
  • 1428 weeks (rounded down)

In other fields

Sometime in the next 24 hours or so, especially if I pull my finger out and get a blog done, Well This Is What I Think will pass 7,000 hits, only 6,800 or so of which were me.

I just wanted to express my genuine thanks to everyone. I know by international blog standards that still makes WTIWIT a miniscule minnow amongst whales, but I am exceptionally gratified, and I am encouraged to keep blathering on about what interests me and stuff that I notice that I think warrants re-blogging.

It seems the esoteric mixture of pop culture, ad news, poetry, news and current affairs, and political ranting does have it’s appeal, although ironically it is my posts on marketing and advertising that seem the most popular. Perhaps that reflects the fact that in that area I can at least claim to have some idea what I am talking about.

It’s all about the interaction, folks. Merci beaucoup times 7,000. Nearly.